Los Angeles Avocado Flag

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This flag design was proposed by Ricardo Tomasz. It is designed to represent the Los Angeles history of farming, particularly California’s favorite fruit, Avocados. The flag incorporates the current Los Angeles City flag colors, which also represent the history of California crops: olive trees (green), orange groves (gold) and vineyards (red).

The avocado (Persea americana) is a tree long thought to have originated in South Central Mexico,[2] classified as a member of the flowering plant family Lauraceae.[3] Recent archaeological research produced evidence that the avocado was present in Peru as long as 8,000 to 15,000 years ago.[4] Avocado (also alligator pear) refers to the tree’s fruit, which is botanically a large berry containing a single large seed.[5]

Avocado Heights is an unincorporated census-designated place in Los Angeles County, California, United States. It lies in the San Gabriel Valley, near Puente Hills. On the northern border lies the unincorporated community of West Puente Valley; on the eastern border the City of Industry. A thin strip of the City of Industry runs to the south, and the Pomona Freeway and the Puente Hills are farther south. To the west is the San Gabriel River and the San Gabriel River Freeway, as well as the California Country Club. Avocado Heights is approximately 15 miles (24 km) from the downtown Los Angeles Civic Center. The population was 15,411 at the 2010 census, up from 15,148 at the 2000 census.

A significant portion of Avocado Heights remains equestrian and semi-rural, with many homes on lots of 0.5 acres 21,780 square feet (2,023 m2) or more. The proximity of polluting industries in what became the City of Industry, as well as the Puente Hills Landfill, suppressed property values throughout the post-World War II era–discouraging the development that transformed most of the San Gabriel Valley into a relatively densely developed suburban area.

 

Why Flags Matter

Why Los Angeles Needs A New Flag

As was stated in the recent online petition:

Los Angeles is currently undergoing a profound transformation. Development is booming, neighborhoods are thriving, and the very heart of our city is growing and adapting to meet the demands of an ever-changing 21st century. We are not just home to celluloid dreams and iconic landscapes, but also to a growing tech industry, world-class cultural centers, and the fastest growing mass transit system in the country. We are in the midst of a stunning revival and, as such, will host the 2028 Olympics. We have set a course to strengthen and transform our city, to create a more sustainable L.A., and right now all eyes are on us. It’s time we show the world how beautiful, creative, and united we truly are.

Sign the online petition and click below to purchase a memento of your favorite design.


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