Los Angeles Mountains Flag

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This flag design was proposed by Ricardo Tomasz, and is an inverted version of a previous design. It is designed to represent the Los Angeles Mountain Ranges that help to structure the shape and character of Los Angeles.

Southern California is separated from the rest of the state by the east-west trending Transverse Ranges, including the Tehachapi, which separate the Central Valley from the Mojave Desert. Urban Southern California intersperses the valleys between the Santa Susana Mountains, Santa Monica Mountains and San Gabriel Mountains, which range from the Pacific Coast, eastward over 100 miles (160 km), to the San Bernardino Mountains, north of San Bernardino. The highest point of the range is Mount San Gorgonio at 11,499 feet (3,505 m). The San Gabriel Mountains have Mount Wilson observatory, where the redshift was discovered in the 1920s.

The Transverse Ranges include a series of east–west trending mountain ranges that extend from Point Conception at the western tip of Santa Barbara County, eastward (and a bit south) to the east end of the San Jacinto Mountains in western Riverside County. The Santa Ynez Mountains make up the westernmost ranges, extending from Point Conception to the Ventura River just west-northwest of Ojai, in Ventura County. Pine Mountain Ridge, Nordhoff Ridge–Topatopa Mountains, Rincon Peak–Red Mountain, Sulphur Mountain, Santa Paula Ridge, South Mountain–Oat Mountain–Santa Susana Mountains, Simi Hills, Conejo Mountains–Santa Monica Mountains are all part of the Western Transverse Ranges, in Ventura and western Los Angeles counties.

The Liebre Mountains occupy the northwest corner of Los Angeles County, and represent a northwestern extension of the San Gabriel Mountains, both on the Pacific Plate side of the San Andreas Fault. The fault divides the San Gabriel Mountains from the San Bernardino Mountains further to the east in San Bernardino County.

It is possible to surf in the Pacific Ocean and ski on a mountain during the same winter day in Southern California.

Why Flags Matter

Why Los Angeles Needs A New Flag

As was stated in the recent online petition:

Los Angeles is currently undergoing a profound transformation. Development is booming, neighborhoods are thriving, and the very heart of our city is growing and adapting to meet the demands of an ever-changing 21st century. We are not just home to celluloid dreams and iconic landscapes, but also to a growing tech industry, world-class cultural centers, and the fastest growing mass transit system in the country. We are in the midst of a stunning revival and, as such, will host the 2028 Olympics. We have set a course to strengthen and transform our city, to create a more sustainable L.A., and right now all eyes are on us. It’s time we show the world how beautiful, creative, and united we truly are.

Sign the online petition and click below to purchase a memento of your favorite design.


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